1. Notes: 15589 / 2 days ago  from itsfullofstars (originally from benjamingrimes)
    benjamingrimes:

Blood Moon eclipse. Next time I’m going to rent a longer lens.
4/15/14

    benjamingrimes:

    Blood Moon eclipse. Next time I’m going to rent a longer lens.

    4/15/14

     
  2. Notes: 296 / 2 months ago  from rorschachx
    The VLT Survey Telescope (VST) at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile has captured this richly detailed new image of the Lagoon Nebula. This giant cloud of gas and dust is creating intensely bright young stars, and is home to young stellar clusters. This image is a tiny part of just one of eleven public surveys of the sky now in progress using ESO telescopes. Together these are providing a vast legacy of publicly available data for the global astronomical community. | image: ESO

    The VLT Survey Telescope (VST) at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile has captured this richly detailed new image of the Lagoon Nebula. This giant cloud of gas and dust is creating intensely bright young stars, and is home to young stellar clusters. This image is a tiny part of just one of eleven public surveys of the sky now in progress using ESO telescopes. Together these are providing a vast legacy of publicly available data for the global astronomical community. | image: ESO

     
  3. Notes: 7202 / 2 months ago  from did-you-kno
     
  4. Notes: 1 / 3 months ago  from iamt-hana

    iamt-hana:

    Manukan and Mamutik Islands, Sabah

  5. Notes: 7294 / 3 months ago  from newsweek (originally from thingsmagazine)
    Tilt Shift Cosmos
     
  6. Notes: 86 / 3 months ago  from ha-ha-wtf
    Mind-Bending Gifs of Outer Space
You could fly to space, but it’s way out of your budget. While you search the couch cushions for change, why not just enjoy these gifs?

    Mind-Bending Gifs of Outer Space

    You could fly to space, but it’s way out of your budget. While you search the couch cushions for change, why not just enjoy these gifs?

     
  7. Notes: 185658 / 3 months ago  from wetheurban

    SPOTLIGHT: Visual Artist Brock Davis

    Brock Davis is an award-winning, multidisciplinary artist and creative director with a knack for creating ground-breaking work.

    Read More

  8. Notes: 89 / 3 months ago  from futureofscience
    Some predictions on the future of science in 2014:
Space probes
The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft could become the first mission to land a probe on a comet. If all goes well, it will land on comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko in November. Mars will also be a busy place: India’s orbiter mission should arrive at the planet in September, about the same time as NASA’s MAVEN probe. And NASA’s Curiosity rover should finally make it to its mission goal, the slopes of the 5.5-kilometre-high Aeolis Mons, where it will look for evidence of water. Back on Earth, NASA hopes to launch an orbiter to monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide.
Neural feats
Neurobiologist Miguel Nicolelis at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, has developed a brain-controlled exoskeleton that he expects will enable a person with a spinal-cord injury to kick the first ball at the 2014 football World Cup in Brazil. Meanwhile, attempts are being made in people with paralysis to reconnect their brains directly to paralysed areas, rather than to robotic arms or exoskeletons. In basic research, neuroscientists are excited about money from big US and European brain initiatives, such as Europe’s Human Brain Project.
Miniature sequencer
Technology that rapidly sequences DNA as it is fed through a ring of proteins, known as a biological nanopore, will hit the market this year after decades of development. Oxford Nano-pore Technologies in Oxford, UK, aims to release the first data from a disposable sequencer the size of a memory stick, which it is sending to scientists for testing. It promises to read longer strands of DNA than other techniques (potentially useful in sequencing mixed samples of bacterial DNA, for example), and to show results in real time.
A better climate
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will complete its fifth assessment report by November. The findings of working groups II and III will focus on the impacts of climate change, and on how societies can adapt to or mitigate those effects (working group I published its findings last year). Away from formal negotiations, United Nations secretary-general Ban Ki-moon is hoping for “bold pledges” on emissions at a summit in New York in September. In research, a large carbon capture and storage project in Canada — the Can$1.24-billion (US$1.17-billion) Boundary Dam coal power-plant in Saskatchewan — begins commercial operation in April.
Making waves
The European Space Agency’s Planck satellite team should release data on how the polarization of photons from the Universe’s cosmic microwave background varies across the sky. This esoteric pattern is thought to have been generated by ‘inflation’, the rapid expansion of the Universe after the Big Bang. If it can be detected, its details could provide evidence of relic gravitational waves, thought to have perturbed space-time in the early Universe.
Read more.

    Some predictions on the future of science in 2014:

    Space probes

    The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft could become the first mission to land a probe on a comet. If all goes well, it will land on comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko in November. Mars will also be a busy place: India’s orbiter mission should arrive at the planet in September, about the same time as NASA’s MAVEN probe. And NASA’s Curiosity rover should finally make it to its mission goal, the slopes of the 5.5-kilometre-high Aeolis Mons, where it will look for evidence of water. Back on Earth, NASA hopes to launch an orbiter to monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    Neural feats

    Neurobiologist Miguel Nicolelis at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, has developed a brain-controlled exoskeleton that he expects will enable a person with a spinal-cord injury to kick the first ball at the 2014 football World Cup in Brazil. Meanwhile, attempts are being made in people with paralysis to reconnect their brains directly to paralysed areas, rather than to robotic arms or exoskeletons. In basic research, neuroscientists are excited about money from big US and European brain initiatives, such as Europe’s Human Brain Project.

    Miniature sequencer

    Technology that rapidly sequences DNA as it is fed through a ring of proteins, known as a biological nanopore, will hit the market this year after decades of development. Oxford Nano-pore Technologies in Oxford, UK, aims to release the first data from a disposable sequencer the size of a memory stick, which it is sending to scientists for testing. It promises to read longer strands of DNA than other techniques (potentially useful in sequencing mixed samples of bacterial DNA, for example), and to show results in real time.

    A better climate

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will complete its fifth assessment report by November. The findings of working groups II and III will focus on the impacts of climate change, and on how societies can adapt to or mitigate those effects (working group I published its findings last year). Away from formal negotiations, United Nations secretary-general Ban Ki-moon is hoping for “bold pledges” on emissions at a summit in New York in September. In research, a large carbon capture and storage project in Canada — the Can$1.24-billion (US$1.17-billion) Boundary Dam coal power-plant in Saskatchewan — begins commercial operation in April.

    Making waves

    The European Space Agency’s Planck satellite team should release data on how the polarization of photons from the Universe’s cosmic microwave background varies across the sky. This esoteric pattern is thought to have been generated by ‘inflation’, the rapid expansion of the Universe after the Big Bang. If it can be detected, its details could provide evidence of relic gravitational waves, thought to have perturbed space-time in the early Universe.

    Read more.

     
  9. Notes: 723 / 4 months ago  from physicsphysics (originally from thatscienceguy)
    Galactic Rotation and Dark Matter:
Stars near the center of a spiral galaxy orbit at roughly the same velocity as stars near the edge of a galaxy, for the Milky Way this is about 220km per second, or 140 miles per second. And that is weird. very weird.
Normally objects in orbital motion move much slower the further away from the center they get, like the planets around the sun - earths velocity is less than that of Venus. So when astronomers discovered this they knew that it must mean there is mass that cannot be seen, and not centered in the same way as regular matter (not all concentrated at the center of the galaxy.)
This is one of the main pieces of evidence for dark matter.  
Models with dark matter spread throughout the galaxy and further confirm this, so now imagine the galaxy as a solid, uniform sphere rather than a bunch of point masses congregating towards the center. Objects orbiting within a uniform sphere only experience the gravitation pull of matter below their orbit, and basically completely ignore everything above them. Its one of those nice mathematically-provable things where everything cancels out. This means that as an object moves further away from the center the net gravitational pull increases exactly proportionally so its speed stays the same.
At first glance a spiral galaxy may look as if the edge stars are slower than the center ones, but in reality if that were true the arms would become so elongated and twisted that it would be hard to tell one spiral arm from its neighbors. 
This same effect can be applied to the solar system - Neptune’s orbit is faster than it should be. however the effect does not compare to the effect seen on the galactic scale.

    Galactic Rotation and Dark Matter:

    Stars near the center of a spiral galaxy orbit at roughly the same velocity as stars near the edge of a galaxy, for the Milky Way this is about 220km per second, or 140 miles per second. And that is weird. very weird.

    Normally objects in orbital motion move much slower the further away from the center they get, like the planets around the sun - earths velocity is less than that of Venus. So when astronomers discovered this they knew that it must mean there is mass that cannot be seen, and not centered in the same way as regular matter (not all concentrated at the center of the galaxy.)

    This is one of the main pieces of evidence for dark matter.  

    Models with dark matter spread throughout the galaxy and further confirm this, so now imagine the galaxy as a solid, uniform sphere rather than a bunch of point masses congregating towards the center. Objects orbiting within a uniform sphere only experience the gravitation pull of matter below their orbit, and basically completely ignore everything above them. Its one of those nice mathematically-provable things where everything cancels out. This means that as an object moves further away from the center the net gravitational pull increases exactly proportionally so its speed stays the same.

    At first glance a spiral galaxy may look as if the edge stars are slower than the center ones, but in reality if that were true the arms would become so elongated and twisted that it would be hard to tell one spiral arm from its neighbors. 

    This same effect can be applied to the solar system - Neptune’s orbit is faster than it should be. however the effect does not compare to the effect seen on the galactic scale.

     
  10. Notes: 5702 / 4 months ago  from did-you-kno
    Source 
     
avatar_128
 
 
There'll always be lessons to be learnt. No matter what kinda thing it is, So, it's better to book your brain. Not your face ! :D
 
 

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